Posts Tagged ‘paper money’

The debate between fiat and commodity monetary standards is slowly re-entering the mainstream. See here, here and here. To those new to the subject, this is simply a debate as to whether the money in your pocket is backed by nothing other than government mandate and coercion (fiat) or a by a physical commodity that has value beyond it’s use as money (usually gold or silver).

This is a debate which many had considered to be closed, an argument that only existed on the fringes of academia amongst eccentric free marketeers. Succesive rounds of quantitative easing, coupled with negative real interest rates have thrust this debate back into focus.

It is bizarre that it has taken so long for this issue to re-surface. The intellectual superiority enjoyed by paper money is based on a 42 year experiment that has seen the value of all paper monies race each other toward their intrinsic value – ZERO.

The alternative, a commodity standard based on gold or silver (or a combination) is viewed  by the mainstream as atavistic, “a barborous relic”. This completely overlooks the historical track record of commodity money as society’s choice of preferred choice of exchange media.

The majority of coverage will argue against the gold standard, no doubt citing the flawed gold bullion standard (1925-1931) and Bretton Woods system (1946-1971) as representative of the failings of commodity backed monies.  Neatly overlooking that both standards were not the product of the free market but centrally planned and enforced by government.

The establishment has good reason to fear the return of a TRUE gold standard via the free market, beyond the control and manipulation of government and central bank. Such a gold standard would enforce fiscal responsibility, removing the state’s ability to run up unsustainable debt backstopped by the printing press. The current monetary world order is a top down system, designed, implemented and controlled by state bureaucrats and apparatchiks for the benefit of the establishment and it’s chosen favourites. There are plenty of vested interests who are keen to see it remain that way.

I would encourage the reader to look beyond the standard criticisms. One thing is for certain – the gold standard is back on the radar. This can only be a postive thing, especially as the loose monetary policy pursued by central banks world over causes more people  to wake up to the reality of their savings  being stolen through central bank induced inflation.